Freight Train – Pacific, Missouri

Freight Train - Pacific, Missouri © Robert Jay Matejcek

Is anyone else craving beans, or is it just me?!

Charlie Kelly: “How do hobos fit all this stuff into a bandana? It doesn’t make sense, man! We’re gonna need a towel, or a tablecloth or something, but… ahhh! It’s not gonna look cool! We’ll look like a******s!”

Charlie Day – It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia

About this image: digital photograph taken and modified with smart phone

Nickel Plate Road No. 170

nickel_plate_road_no_170

More train bits! Details below for fellow rail enthusiasts like Martin.

Dr. John Watson: “Did you just kill my new wife?!”

Sherlock Holmes: “Of course not!”

Dr. John Watson: “How can you say that, when you just threw her off a train?!”

Sherlock Holmes: “As I said, I timed it perfectly!”

Jude Law & Robert Downey Jr. – Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows

About this image: digital photograph (Canon 300D) lightly modified in Adobe Photoshop

The following Information is from The Museum of Transportation, St. Louis:

‘# 170 New York, Chicago & St. Louis (Nickel Plate Road) 1927 – Built by the American Locomotive Company (ALCO), this 4-6-4 “Hudson” type locomotive was originally used in heavy passenger service until 1947 when the Nickel Plate Road converted to diesels. It went to light freight and passenger service. Altogether this locomotive traveled over 2,000,000 miles which is the equivalent to 80 trips around the world. It weighs 536,000 pounds, has 74 inch drive wheels, 25 x 26 inch cylinders and has a tractive effort of 42,000 pounds. The smoke deflectors on the front along the smokebox, often called “elephant ears”, lift the smoke over the cab and out of the faces of the crew. Donated in 1957 by the Nickel Plate Road.’

Freight

I haven’t posted vector stuff here before (so I might as well start way back in the archives). This was drawn the loooong way (for a slow guy like me, anyway)… with Illustrator’s pen, pencil and shape tools… no filters or live trace. So… there’s that.

These tracks were located behind a renovated depot that housed an architectural firm I once worked for (they designed the building on the left). I could just glance out the window and see trains rolling by… not too shabby, eh?

Milton Waddams: “…and I used to be over by the window, and I could see the squirrels, and they were merry, but then, they switched from the Swingline to the Boston stapler, but I kept my Swingline stapler because it didn’t bind up as much, and I kept the staples for the Swingline stapler and it’s not okay…”

– Stephen Root – Office Space

About this image: digital media – vector art created with Adobe Illustrator