Freight Train – Pacific, Missouri

Freight Train - Pacific, Missouri © Robert Jay Matejcek

Is anyone else craving beans, or is it just me?!

Charlie Kelly: “How do hobos fit all this stuff into a bandana? It doesn’t make sense, man! We’re gonna need a towel, or a tablecloth or something, but… ahhh! It’s not gonna look cool! We’ll look like a******s!”

Charlie Day – It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia

About this image: digital photograph taken and modified with smart phone

Plastic Porter

plastic_porter

I might have jumped a little. Full-disclosure. Although, on second thought, I’m pretty sure I could out-run this dude. Still, such creepiness will probably affect the tip.

Wes Mantooth: “What, you guys can’t say one thing?! Even the guy that can’t think said something! You guys just stand there?! Come on!”

– Vince Vaughn – Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgundy

About this image: digital photograph taken and modified with smart phone (minimally edited in Photoshop)

Nickel Plate Road No. 170

nickel_plate_road_no_170

More train bits! Details below for fellow rail enthusiasts like Martin.

Dr. John Watson: “Did you just kill my new wife?!”

Sherlock Holmes: “Of course not!”

Dr. John Watson: “How can you say that, when you just threw her off a train?!”

Sherlock Holmes: “As I said, I timed it perfectly!”

Jude Law & Robert Downey Jr. – Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows

About this image: digital photograph (Canon 300D) lightly modified in Adobe Photoshop

The following Information is from The Museum of Transportation, St. Louis:

‘# 170 New York, Chicago & St. Louis (Nickel Plate Road) 1927 – Built by the American Locomotive Company (ALCO), this 4-6-4 “Hudson” type locomotive was originally used in heavy passenger service until 1947 when the Nickel Plate Road converted to diesels. It went to light freight and passenger service. Altogether this locomotive traveled over 2,000,000 miles which is the equivalent to 80 trips around the world. It weighs 536,000 pounds, has 74 inch drive wheels, 25 x 26 inch cylinders and has a tractive effort of 42,000 pounds. The smoke deflectors on the front along the smokebox, often called “elephant ears”, lift the smoke over the cab and out of the faces of the crew. Donated in 1957 by the Nickel Plate Road.’

Car 54

I wanted  it to look like this car from the Museum of Transportation could still be in service, so I re-built quite a bit of the above.

If you’re curious… unedited photo here (click thumbnail for full-size)… and more info below:

  • Mass. Bay Area Trans. Authority No. 54
  • Coach (Model RDC-1)
  • Budd; 1954
  • Self-Propelled, diesel-powered, built for Canadian Pacific Ry.

About this image: digital photograph; moderately modified

Weekly Photo Challenge: Old Fashioned

Here’s another shot from the Museum of Transportation in St. Louis. And some stuff about the subject matter. You know… just in case. Never hurts to have the info.

  • Duluth, Missabe & Iron Range No. 502
  • Baldwin, 1916
  • Heavy freight steam engine; hauled iron ore

Dr. Evil: “Right, people you have to tell me these things, okay? I’ve been frozen for thirty years, okay? Throw me a frickin’ bone here! I’m the boss! Need the info.”

– Mike Myers – Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery

About this image: digital photograph, moderately modified

Railcar Noir

Here’s a shot I took at the Museum of Transportation in St. Louis. Also, this is the part of the show where I should probably pen something all dark and brooding… if only I had ‘the writing skills’…

Napoleon Dynamite: “…I don’t even have any good skills.”

Pedro Sanchez: “What do you mean?”

Napoleon Dynamite: “You know, like… nunchuck skills… bow-hunting skills… computer-hacking skills…”

Jon Heder & Efren Ramirez – Napoleon Dynamite

Steel

Okay, I can admit it… I still think ‘trains is ‘perty cool’. Someday I’d love to have an extremely small scale 20’s era cityscape/train set (built-in under a glass topped coffee table). I might be alone in this thought, though; it’s probably my When Harry Met Sally wagon wheel coffee table moment.

Speaking of trains, I used to be employed by an architectural firm practicing out of a remodeled depot – where I worked diligently got to watch railroad stuff all the time. The trains would literally shake the building… it was pretty cool.

About this image: Digital photograph lightly manipulated. I think the shallow depth of field works well in this shot… although I doubt I can be credited for that. This was one of the first digital photos I took, and my camera was likely set on full auto. But I still like to pretend I’m responsible for everything you see here.